The Wall Street Journal - 13.08.2019

(Ann) #1

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Tuesday, August 13, 2019 |A


tions were nearly completely
cut.
Parisa Nissar, 24 years old,
who studies at New Delhi’s Ja-
mia Milia Islamia University, re-
turned to the national capital
from her home in Srinagar last
week. With her mother’s home
landline dead, she managed
with persistent calling to reach
her on her cousin’s phone.
She said her mother told her
markets remained closed after
being open for only a single day
on Sunday.
“My mother and sister
couldn’t even buy clothes and
gifts,” she said. “Today, they
could not offer prayers even in
the nearby mosque as they
couldn’t go past the barricades
manned by security forces. My

mother couldn’t even buy her
favorite pastries from the bak-
ery she visits every Eid.”
The holiday has been finan-
cially disastrous for many who

depend on it for much of their
year’s income.
Zain Mushtaq, a 20-year-old
student at the Delhi University,
said his father is a livestock

dealer and waits for Eid every
year to make good money by
selling goats, which are slaugh-
tered in a traditional ritual of-
fering on the holiday.
Usually, his whole flock is
sold off by the day before Eid.
This year he has sold only 20
out of 250 goats, so far, mostly
to neighbors.
The police and security re-
strictions have made it difficult
for him to step out and set up
his shop in a festival market
that is set up every year before
Eid, Mr. Mushtaq said.
“Who will take the goats af-
ter Eid gets over? This is the
first time we have not cele-
brated the festival the way we
are used to in the last 20
years.”

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WORLD NEWS


NEW DELHI—Residents of
India-administered Kashmir ob-
served the Muslim holiday of
Eid al-Adha under exceedingly
tight security, with Indian para-
military soldiers lining roads,
concertina wire spooled across
road intersections and the capi-
tal’s key mosques shut down
and circled by soldiers before
dawn.
The long-troubled region,
disputed between India and
Pakistan, has been under a tight
military clampdown for more
than week after the Indian gov-
ernment stripped the state,
called Jammu and Kashmir, of
the semiautonomy it enjoyed
for decades as Hindu-majority
India’s only Muslim majority
state.
Many residents managed to
reach small neighborhood
mosques to pray on the holy
day. Video footage on social
media purportedly from the
state capital of Srinagar on
Monday depicted lines of men
dressed in white being admit-
ted one-by-one into a small
mosque by khaki-clad soldiers.
“People were allowed to visit
nearby mosques to offer
prayers, but we didn’t allow
congregations. They were al-
lowed to move around in their
local areas. This was to prevent
any disturbance,” said Dilbag
Singh, director general of police
in Srinagar. He said there were
no reports of violence or pro-
tests in the Srinagar valley,
home to most of the region’s
Muslims.
India and Pakistan both
claim all of the Kashmir region.
It is divided along a highly mili-
tarized line of control that sep-
arates the armies of the two
nuclear-armed powers. On the
Indian-administered side an
anti-India separatist movement
has battled against India’s gov-
ernment for decades, often with
the support of extremist groups
based on the Pakistan side.
On Monday, a day most fam-
ilies reach out to each other,
calling into or within the region
was almost impossible as the
internet and other communica-

BYBILLSPINDLE
ANDVIBHUTIAGARWAL

India Tightens Kashmir Security


Security officials questioned a man in Srinagar, Kashmir, on the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha. Below, women passed concertina wire.

FROM TOP: TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES; VIVEK SINGH FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

WASHINGTON—The U.S.
military is investigating
whether friendly fire caused
the first combat death involv-
ing an American service mem-
ber in Iraq this year, defense
officials said.
Marine Gunnery Sgt. Scott
A. Koppenhafer was part of a
team of Iraqi and U.S. troops
conducting an operation Satur-
day against a suspected Islamic
State target in Iraq’s Nineveh
province when he was killed,
the officials said.
The Pentagon first described
his death as the result of being
“engaged by enemy small-arms
fire while conducting combat
operations.” Officials now are
investigating whether he was
accidentally struck by Iraqi or
U.S. forces, the officials said.
Gunnery Sgt. Koppenhafer,
35, of Colorado, became at least
the fifth U.S. service member to
die in combat in Iraq since the
deployment of U.S. troops after
Islamic State took control of
Mosul—the capital of Nineveh
province—in June 2014.
There currently are roughly
5,200 U.S. troops in Iraq, who
primarily train Iraqi security
forces and conduct counterter-
rorism operations. Despite the
collapse of the terror group’s
self-proclaimed caliphate this
year, defense officials repeat-
edly have warned that Islamic
State still poses a threat.
Earlier this month, a Penta-
gon’s Office of Inspector Gen-
eral report concluded that Is-
lamic State militants are
strengthening their capability
to carry out attacks in Iraq and
Syria. The Trump administra-
tion’s decision to reduce U.S.
forces in Syria, shrink the
American diplomatic presence
in Iraq, and divert reconnais-
sance systems to efforts to
monitor Iran also have worked
to Islamic State’s benefit, the
report found.


BYNANCYA.YOUSSEF


U.S. Probes


Iraq Death


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