The Wall Street Journal - 13.08.2019

(Ann) #1

A10B| Tuesday, August 13, 2019 THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.**


the lions’ marble, the library
said. The nine-week restora-
tion will include a laser clean-
ing, reinforcement of previous
repairs and the filling of
cracks and chips with grout,
according to the library.
Patience and Fortitude will
be covered with plywood en-
closures during the $250,
restoration project, which is
being funded by the New York
Life Foundation and patron do-
nations, the library said.
“The lions have earned some

time at the spa,” said Anthony
W. Marx, the library’s presi-
dent. He said he hoped the pub-
lic has the “patience and forti-
tude” to endure their absence.
The lions have been perched
in front of the beaux arts li-
brary building at Fifth Avenue
and 42nd Street since 1911.
The pair have been adopted as
the library’s mascot and trade-
marked by the institution.
The lions need restoration
every seven to 10 years, accord-
ing to the library. They were

last restored in 2011, and before
that, in 2004, the library said.
In the past, Patience and For-
titude have been topped with
Yankees and Mets hats, gradua-
tion caps and other celebratory
adornments. They have worn
wreaths during various seasons.
Several other improvement
projects are under way at the
flagship library, which also is
called the Stephen A.
Schwarzman Building, includ-
ing the restoration of three
plaster ceilings.

The New York Public Li-
brary’s famed marble lions are
getting a grooming.
Patience and Fortitude, the
sculptures that have been
guarding the entrance to the
library’s main branch in Mid-
town Manhattan for more than
100 years, will undergo essen-
tial repair work starting early
next month.
Snow, rain, wind and traffic
exhaust have taken a toll on

BYALEXAST.JOHN

Public Library’s Lions Will Get a Face-Lift


touted as a key step forward
by Democrats who now fully
control the state Legislature.
“Today, New York stands as
a beacon of hope for survivors
across the country as we
usher a movement into law,”
said state Sen. Alessandra
Biaggi, a Democrat from the
Bronx who sponsored the ha-
rassment bill.
The new law would ban the
use of mandatory arbitration
by employers to settle dis-
putes, and it increases, from
one to three years, the amount
of time an employee has to file
a claim with the state’s Divi-
sion of Human Rights. It also
weakens an employer’s ability
to defend against claims by
saying an employee didn’t file
an internal complaint.
Frank Kerbein, director of
the Center for Human Re-
sources at the Business Coun-
cil of New York State, which
lobbied against the bill, said
employers already were work-
ing to stamp out workplace
harassment, and the new law
would result in more legal
claims.
The ban on mandatory arbi-
tration, he said, is inconsistent
with federal law and predicted
it would be challenged in
court.
“We’re concerned about be-
ing civilly liable as an em-
ployer even if we do every-
thing correctly, as prescribed
by law, and work diligently to
create an environment free
from harassment,” Mr. Kerbein
said.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo
changed the legal standard for
workplace-harassment claims
in New York, a move that ad-
vocates said was long overdue
and could result in more liti-
gation against employers.
Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat,
signed a law Monday that
would categorize conduct as
harassment even if it isn’t
“severe or pervasive,” the
previous threshold estab-
lished by courts. The gover-
nor called that former stan-
dard “absurd.”
Harassment now will be de-
fined as any conduct that sub-
jects someone to inferior
treatment beyond “petty
slights and trivial inconve-
niences” on the basis of age,
race, sex, religion and other
specified categories, according
to the law.
The protections cover all
private employers—small
businesses previously were
exempt—as well as state and
local governments, domestic
workers and independent
contractors.
Miriam Clark, president of
the National Employment
Lawyers Association/New
York, said the severe or perva-
sive standard was unfair, and
that the new standard matches
what already is in place in
New York City.
The legislation stemmed
from the first state hearings
on workplace harassment in a
quarter-century and was

BYJIMMYVIELKIND

Harassment Law


In the Workplace


Tightened in N.Y.


GREATER NEW YORK WATCH


CONNECTICUT

Missing Hiker Is
Found Alive in Woods

A woman reported missing
after she went for a hike has
been found alive in the woods.
State police said 45-year-old
Kimberly Kasulis, of Somers, Conn.,
was found Monday by searchers
near the Soapstone Mountain
Trail, which runs close to the El-

lington-Somers line. She was
taken to a hospital for evaluation.
Ms. Kasulis was last seen
Saturday on the trail, a spot
that her family told police she
frequently goes for hikes.
Her vehicle had been found
abandoned in the area and her
cellphone was discovered nearby.
Teams of volunteers, fire-
fighters, police and dogs had
been involved in the search.
—Associated Press

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Program Screens
For Suicide Risk

Probation departments across
New York have started screening
young offenders for risk of sui-
cide as a way to connect them
with mental-health services.
Ten counties in upstate New
York are participating in the pro-
gram developed by researchers

at Columbia University. The proj-
ect, called e-Connect, includes
counties that cover rural swaths
of the state.
Probation officials said they
hope addressing young offend-
ers’ mental-health needs would
help reduce their chances of get-
ting in trouble.
The program also will stream-
line access to mental-health ser-
vices, they said.
—Associated Press

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, will get a nine-week, $250,000 restoration starting next month.

MICHAEL NOBLE, JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS


Emma Goodman is a staff
attorney with the Legal Aid
Society. An article Monday
about sealing the records of

people with low-level mari-
juana convictions incorrectly
gave her last name as Gold-
man in one reference.

Readers can alert The Wall Street Journal to any errors in news articles by
emailing wsjcontact@wsj.com or by calling 888-410-2667.

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