The Wall Street Journal - 13.08.2019

(Ann) #1

A12| Tuesday, August 13, 2019 THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.


ROCK OF AGES| By Peter A. Collins
Across
1 Musician Baez
5 Cry of contempt
8 Basic unit of
energy
13 Spanishstews
15 Hockey rink
surface
16 Black-and-white
whales
17 Moor
18 With 41-Across,
tag line for
64-Across
20 “Don’t bother”
22 Absorb, as an
expense
23 Additional
24 Like snails and
tortoises
26 Hibernation spot

28 Spot on a deuce
31 White-collar
crime
33 Congressional
hearing
broadcaster
37 From here ___
39 “___ girl!”
40 Algebra pioneer
George
41 See 18-Across
44 Regatta teams
45 Capital on the
Baltic Sea
46 Shipbuilder’s
material
47 Cruel
48 Oreo stuff
50 Sound from a
griddle
51 Office note

53 Mattress
annoyance
55 Formerly
58 ___ carte
60 Simple sandwich,
simply
64 Event of
August 15-18,
1969, at which
the six musicians
in this puzzle
performed
67 Beach-closing
bacteria
68 Text alternative
69 Genes material
70 Jeans material
71 Takeoff
annoyance
72 Group of songs
73 Musician
Shankar

TheWSJDailyCrossword |Edited by Mike Shenk


1234 567 89101112
13 14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40
41 42 43
44 45 46
47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63
64 65 66 67
68 69 70
71 72 73

Previous Puzzle’s Solution

s
Solve this puzzle online and discuss it at WSJ.com/Puzzles.

VIVA FISH FISTS
CRASHINTO ANTON
RENTALCAR CLOSE
OIL INSTANCE
SAM READYTOWEAR
USER I DS ERS
THROE CUSP SAT
RECORDOFTHEYEAR
ANY ATOP NEWME
CPR ALTROCK
REAL I TYSTAR NOS
EXCELSAT B IO
ACURA REARENDED
MOT I F DEVASTATE
SPECS SLAT ONCE

Down
1 Musician
Sebastian
2 Bread stick?
3 Mathematician
Turing
4 Basketball’s
Archibald and
Thurmond
5 Comedy
routine
6 Joint problem
7 Singer in a
Christmas
carol
8 Musician Cocker
9 Gets Chinese,
maybe
10 The Golden
Bears, for short
11 Big name in
chips
12 In ___ (actually
existing)
14 Cupboard
component
19 Greek vowel
21 Classical
column style
25 Some
Winslow Homer
paintings
27 Long-range
weapon, briefly
28 One found in
a pound

29 Red head?
30 Pan, for one
32 Allegheny’s
name after 1979
34 Models strike
them
35 Wanted poster
info
36 Guitar parts
38 Time and the
Times, e.g.
42 Tennis great
Arthur
43 Block
49 Plant firmly
52 Yoga class
surface
54 Indiana
hoopster
55 Carried a
balance
56 City on the
Seward
Peninsula
57 Frosty’s eyes
59 Case for a
dermatologist
61 Prefix between
octa- and deca-
62 Roman 554
63 Musician
Hendrix
65 Musician Stone
66 Dennings of
“2 Broke Girls”

Weather
Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

City Hi LoW Hi LoW City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W

Today Tomorrow Today Tomorrow

City Hi LoW Hi LoW

Anchorage 71 63 c 73 61 sh
Atlanta 96 79 pc 94 75 t
Austin 102 74 s 101 75 t
Baltimore 88 71 t 87 68 pc
Boise 91 62 s 93 62 s
Boston 82 65 r 74 64 pc
Burlington 80 55 pc 76 54 pc
Charlotte 94 77 pc 93 72 t
Chicago 81 66 c 76 63 c
Cleveland 80 64 r 80 62 pc
Dallas 101 76 s 94 76 t
Denver 88 59 s 88 60 s
Detroit 81 64 c 80 64 c
Honolulu 90 75 pc 89 78 pc
Houston 101 81 s 97 79 t
Indianapolis 86 65 t 83 65 pc
Kansas City 88 65 pc 84 63 s
Las Vegas 106 81 s 107 82 s
Little Rock 97 75 pc 90 71 s
Los Angeles 87 64 pc 90 63 s
Miami 91 77 t 91 77 t
Milwaukee 79 66 c 75 62 c
Minneapolis 76 61 c 73 59 c
Nashville 98 75 t 91 69 pc
New Orleans 95 82 pc 89 80 t
New York City 80 68 r 80 66 pc
Oklahoma City 89 69 t 91 69 s

Omaha 87 64 pc 80 63 pc
Orlando 90 76 t 88 76 t
Philadelphia 85 71 r 85 69 pc
Phoenix 109 86 s 112 87 s
Pittsburgh 79 65 r 80 64 pc
Portland, Maine 78 58 sh 76 56 pc
Portland, Ore. 86 63 s 84 61 pc
Sacramento 98 62 s 103 64 s
St. Louis 88 69 pc 87 67 s
Salt Lake City 92 68 s 94 70 s
San Francisco 79 58 pc 83 59 pc
Santa Fe 89 59 s 86 58 pc
Seattle 81 60 s 80 60 pc
Sioux Falls 81 58 pc 73 58 pc
Wash., D.C. 92 76 t 88 73 pc

Amsterdam 64 53 t 67 59 r
Athens 92 75 s 94 73 s
Baghdad 119 87 s 119 88 s
Bangkok 89 80 t 90 79 t
Beijing 88 71 c 88 69 pc
Berlin 72 53 t 70 54 pc
Brussels 65 50 t 67 59 sh
Buenos Aires 51 34 c 53 38 s
Dubai 108 92 s 109 93 s
Dublin 64 55 sh 66 54 c
Edinburgh 63 45 pc 63 53 c

Frankfurt 71 50 t 71 57 pc
Geneva 72 51 pc 74 54 pc
Havana 93 74 pc 91 74 pc
Hong Kong 91 84 t 91 82 t
Istanbul 86 73 s 85 73 pc
Jakarta 91 75 pc 92 75 pc
Jerusalem 87 66 s 87 66 s
Johannesburg 74 47 s 75 48 s
London 70 55 pc 66 57 r
Madrid 87 61 pc 92 65 s
Manila 88 80 t 88 80 sh
Melbourne 55 45 sh 57 44 pc
Mexico City 75 56 t 76 56 t
Milan 86 62 pc 83 64 pc
Moscow 73 60 r 74 63 pc
Mumbai 85 81 sh 84 80 sh
Paris 70 54 pc 72 60 c
Rio de Janeiro 84 66 pc 71 63 r
Riyadh 111 85 s 113 84 s
Rome 90 68 pc 87 65 s
San Juan 90 77 pc 90 79 s
Seoul 95 78 pc 95 77 pc
Shanghai 93 79 pc 94 79 s
Singapore 90 79 pc 88 81 pc
Sydney 65 44 s 67 44 s
Taipei City 97 82 t 97 82 pc
Tokyo 9182pc 8983sh
Toronto 7861pc 7461c
Vancouver 74 58 pc 73 58 s
Warsaw 7559pc 6950pc
Zurich 69 48 pc 72 51 pc

Today Tomorrow

U.S. Forecasts


International


City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W

s...sunny; pc... partly cloudy; c...cloudy; sh...showers;
t...t’storms; r...rain; sf...snow flurries; sn...snow; i...ice
Today Tomorrow

Warm

Cold

Stationary

Showers

Rain

T-storms

Snow

Flurries

Ice

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Little Rock

Charlotte

Louisville

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Salt Lake City New York

Tampa

Nashville
Memphis

Detroit

Kansas
City

Dallas
El Paso

Billings

Portland

Miami

San Francisco

Sacramento

Orlando

Atlanta

New Orleans

Houston

San Diego Phoenix

Los Angeles

Las
Vegas

Seattle

Boise

Denver

Mpls./St. Paul

St. Louis

Chicago

Washington D.C.

Boston

Charleston

Milwaukee Hartford

Wichita

Indianapolis

Cleveland

Buffalo

Austin

Helena
Bismarck

Albuquerque

Omaha

Oklahoma City

San Antonio

Des Moines

Sioux Falls

JacksonBirmingham

Cheyenne Philadelphia

Reno

Santa Fe

Colorado
Springs

Pierre

Richmond
Raleigh

Tucson

Albany

Topeka

Columbia

Augusta

Ft. Worth

Eugene

Springfield

Mobile

Toronto

Ottawa

Montreal

Winnipeg

Vancouver Calgary

Edmonton

70s

80s
70s

60s

50s

100s

100s

100s
90s

90s

90s

90s

90s

90s

90s

80s

80s 80s

80s

80s

80s

80s

80s

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70s 70s

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50s

60s

60s 60s
60s

90s

60s

IF YOU HEARyour boss mutter-
ing about scrums, sprints and Kan-
bans, brace yourself. Your depart-
ment might be next to try agile
management, an up-tempo ap-
proach to teamwork that turns of-
fice rituals and roles upside down.
Agile denotes a set of tools long
used in Silicon Valley to keep com-
plex software projects from falling
behind schedule and becoming ob-
solete before they are done. Now,
it’s spreading to other products
and services buffeted by rapid
change. Companies have used agile
management to upgrade banking
apps and even invent new snack
crackers in recent years.
The agile craze has many poten-
tial benefits. There’s no single def-
inition of agile—it’s a set of princi-
ples aimed at freeing teams from
departmental silos and other bu-
reaucracy so they can work more
efficiently. Among the more popu-
lar practices are breaking big proj-
ects down into a series of smaller
tasks, meeting daily to report
progress and eliminate obstacles,
and completing tasks in time peri-
ods called sprints.
When applied wisely, agile prin-
ciples save time and speed team-
work on projects that are complex
or have an uncertain outcome. The
approach requires big changes in
the way people work, however.
That includes learning to work on
self-governing teams and take crit-
icism before a group without turn-
ing defensive, risking career dam-
age for people who are shy or
lacking in confidence. At worst, it
can devolve into a swamp of an-
noying jargon and tedious rituals.
Starmark, an ad agency in Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., embraced agile
techniques about four years ago.
The company used to produce ad
campaigns in the traditional way:

Projects would move from one de-
partment to the next until they
were done. By the time clients got
to review them, their needs may
have changed or the work may
have strayed from their expecta-
tions, requiring costly revisions.
In switching to agile teams,
Starmark tore down the silos sepa-
rating its creative, data-analysis,
copywriting, media and digital de-
partments and replaced them with
two cross-functional, self-managed
teams. The teams hold 20-minute
check-in meetings, also called
stand-ups, each morning. All em-
ployees describe in 60 to 90 sec-
onds what they are working on,
what they plan to deliver that day

and what obstacles they face.
“It sounds like a small thing, but
that’s actually a huge thing,” says
Jacqui Hartnett, Starmark’s presi-
dent. “You make and keep promises
to yourself and others, and do what
you said you were going to do.”
Employees get what they call
flow time from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. for
working free of unplanned interrup-
tions, enabling them to work more
efficiently, says Jacob Edenfield,
Starmark’s associate creative direc-
tor. He suffered from far more in-
terruptions at several other agen-
cies where he has worked. “I don’t
think I could go back to the old way
of working,” he says.
Clients get to review finished fea-

tures or functions of their projects
at two-week intervals, or sprints.
“You fail faster, and that’s a huge
relief,” Mr. Edenfield says. One team
made a quick midcourse correction
in a branding campaign recently by
showing the client a prototype of a
website, rather than the finished
product. When the client objected
to the color scheme, Starmark fixed
the problem right away, saving the
team a few days of makeup work.
That shift also reduces stress,
says Brett Circe, Starmark’s chief
digital officer. “There’s no late
night or weekend work re-engi-
neering the project at the end.”
One Starmark client, senior mar-
keting executive Brandon Hensler,
says meetings at the agency are
brutally honest but often improve
on his team’s ideas. When Mr. Hen-
sler asked Starmark to produce a
two-minute branding video for the
website of his employer, Nova
Southeastern University, Starmark
suggested three shorter videos in-
stead that could be used for more
purposes, including social media.
“They took our concept and made
it so much better,” he says.
Some 75% of North American
employers are using agile practices
at least sometimes, up from 71% last
year, according to a survey of more
than 3,130 project managers by the
Project Management Institute.
Agile techniques can speed pro-
ductivity by 20% to 50% and im-
prove the quality of products and
services, says Jack Skeels, chief ex-
ecutive of AgencyAgile in Los An-
geles, who consulted with Star-
mark on its conversion. But the
principles need to be tailored to fit
particular teams, their mix of work
and the company culture, he says.
Campbell Soup recently used
agile strategies to launch a new
Epic Crunch Goldfish cracker in

n Agile: A tool kit of practices for
turning complex projects over to
self-managed teams that work
closely with customers to deliver
work in stages and respond quickly
to change.
n Backlog: A prioritized list of ev-
erything that needs to be done to
complete a project.
n Sprint: A work period of a fixed
length, usually one to four weeks,
that ends in a demonstration of
work accomplished.
n Promise: The work a team has
committed to deliver during the cur-
rent sprint.
n Scrum: A popular framework for
putting agile methods into practice.
n Scrum master: A person who
helps teams manage themselves,
making sure they have the informa-
tion and resources they need.
n Stand-up (or huddle, scrum or

check-in): A meeting held at the
same time every day when team
members report briefly on work
completed, tasks planned for that
day and obstacles that are getting
in the way.
n Kanban or scrum board: A dis-
play showing one sticky note for
each task in progress, aligned in
separate columns based on their
status—to-do, doing or done.
n Stories: Narratives defining fea-
tures, functions and other work to
be delivered, explaining for whom
the task is being done, what the
customer wants and why.
n Timebox: A maximum period of
time allotted to produce something
of value for the customer.
n Waterfall method: A traditional
method of organizing projects, mov-
ing an entire body of work in steps
from planning to designing, testing
and launching.

Scrums, Kanbans, Sprints: A Guide to the Jargon


JAMES STEINBERG


WORK & FAMILY| SUE SHELLENBARGER


Keeping Up With the Agile Craze


LIFE & ARTS


nine months, much more quickly
than usual. Rather than borrowing
anyone else’s framework, manag-
ers studied agile principles and
adapted them to suit their needs,
says Craig Slavtcheff, vice presi-
dent and head of R&D at the com-
pany. The approach is helping trim
the company’s average launch
times for new products to nine to
12 months from 18 to 24 months.
He says the biggest hurdle for
employees was ignoring old silos
and reaching across departmental
boundaries to access any resources
they needed.
Some bosses have trouble turn-
ing the asylum over to the in-
mates. At Starmark, Ms. Hartnett
says she’s learned to abandon an
old habit she calls management by
walking around, or dropping by
employees’ desks at random times
to chat. When teams are governing
themselves, she says, employees
don’t need the boss dropping by
every half-hour to ask, “Are you
done yet?”
The close, face-to-face teamwork
also can cause friction. Agile teams
often adopt a no-devices rule for
meetings to avoid distractions of
smartphones or laptops. But meet-
ing discussions can be terse and
fast-paced, making it hard for rook-
ies or people who have trouble un-
derstanding spoken instructions to
keep up without taking notes.
“We have a rule: Go no faster
than the slowest person,” Mr.
Skeels of AgencyAgile says. “Be-
fore we move onto another point,
we say, ‘Does everyone get that?’”
The lockstep schedules and the
jargon that defines them can be
grating for some. Carlos Pastor says
that while he learned a lot about
co-workers’ jobs while working on
an agile team at a previous em-
ployer, he disliked the time spent in
meetings and the constraints im-
posed by scheduling work in

sprints. “You can’t put a box around
creative time,” says Mr. Pastor, a
Phoenix marketing manager.
Some employees find it difficult
to speak about their work in front
of a group, says Alison Rose, who
once worked at a company that
used agile methods. “You could see
some people were nervous about
it,” says Ms. Rose, vice president
of public relations for Phoenix-
based 48 West Agency.
Meeting participants are often
asked to call out blockers—col-
leagues or clients who are imped-
ing their work. Talk about obsta-
cles is supposed to be free of
blame or punishment. “When a
team meeting is done right, there
are few things more inclusive and
soothing,” Mr. Skeels says.
But critical or aggressive team
members can wreak havoc by de-
meaning others. “If a manager
runs the meeting like a dictator,”
Mr. Skeels says, “it becomes the
worst meeting of the day.”

This up-tempo style can
boost productivity but
can also pose difficulties
for some employees.
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