The Week Junior UK - 03.08.2019

(Axel Boer) #1
Chimpsenjoyfilmnights

Goodweek /Badweek

Piglet

squid

The River Cam
Sections of theRiver Camaround
Cambridgehavejustone thir doft he
water expected at this time of year,
affecting all those who use the river.
Alack ofrainfall has been blamed,
and in order to help the Camreco ver
farmers upstreamhave been asked
to limit thewater they use.

Scottishinsectlife
A23-year-old has found hundreds
of unexpected species at RSPB
Scotland’sLoch Lomond nature
reserve. In less than three months,
Sam Buckton discovered 315
previously unrecorded animals and
plants, including onewasp never
previously spotted in Scotland.

Do youlove animals? ZSLLondonZoo’s JuniorZooAcademy isagreat waytolearn
about creatures from alloverthe world. Find out moreatzsl.org/experiences

Howlong is the average

giraffe neck?

Giraffes arethe tallest living land
mammals–anadult’sneck is, on
average, almost two metres long.
This allows them to stretch high
into the trees toeatleaves and
twigs no other animalscanreach.
Males swing their necksaround
in fightscalled necking, where
they try to knock their rivals to the
ground and impress females.

GOOD

●LIFESPAN IN THE WILD:Unknown.
●HABITAT:Usually found deeper than 450 metres
beneath the surfaceofalmost all oceans.

●DIET:Unknown, although it probablyeats tiny fish and
other marine animals.

●FUN FACT:Piglet squidcanfill themselves up withwater
until they’rethe sizeofanavocado.

H

g

AS
KA

Z
O
OK
EEP

E

R

Thisadorablesee-throughdeep-watersquidwas
spottedbyscientistsonboardtheunderwatervehicle
NautilusduringanexpeditionfundedbytheOcean
ExplorationTrust.Itgetsitsnamefromitshabitof
fillingupwithwater,whichmakesitlooklikeith as
atiny,pig-likesnout.

Gemma Metcalf
Deputyteam leader of Hoof
Stock, ZSLLondon Zoo

Animals and the environment

3August 2019•The Week Junior 11

MATARNEY/CORNWALL WILDLIFE TRUST


·SAM BUCK


TON·GETTY IMAGES ·


ALAMY

·NATURE PICTURE LIBRAR

Y·REX SHUTTERSTOCK

·COVER IMAGES

Animal

week

BAD

ofthe

A

new study shows that apes, just like
humans, enjoywatching films together.
Scientists from DukeUniversity in the US
looked at how chimpanzeesreacted after
being shownafilm, and found that
they spent moretime
together afterwards. The
results suggest apes get
asimilar positive
feeling to the one we
get whenwatching a
TV programme or film
together.“We thought
that this kind of
connecting through shared
experienceswasuniquely human,”researcher
Wouter Wolf toldTheGuardiannewspaper.
Chimps atareserve in Uganda weregiven
fruit drinkstoe ncourage them to stay in the

same place, while eye-tracking technology
made surethey wereactuallywatching the
screen.To keep their attention,researchers
choseafilm they knewwasahit with other
apes –aminute-long clip ofayoung
playing.
Oncethe clipwas
over,the drinkswere
taken away and the
researcherswatched
what happened next. If
oth chimps had been
hing the same thing –
and had noticed that the other one
wasalso watching it–they weremorelikely
to huddle together and groomeach other.
Wolf says it shows that apes, likehumans, find
someexperiences“richer”when they are
shared with others.

chimp

bo
watch
and had noti

SCREEN

PALS

Thestudy found that
chimps and their smaller
bonobo

cousins

seemto

enjoywatching films
with humans,

too.

Chimps have
complexsocial lives.
Free download pdf