(Antfer) #1

DECEMBER 27, 2019


Rewind


“Peanuts will be as much a part of Christmas this week as holly,


mistletoe and Santa Claus,” Newsweek wrote. Charles M. Schulz,


creator of America’s favorite comic strip in 1950, has “given the world a dozen


definitions of happiness.” The then-$150 million empire was flourishing with


books, TV specials, movies, a musical and countless branded products. After


nearly half a century, the last original Peanuts comic strip was published on


February 13, 2000, mere hours after Schulz’s death. His Peanuts legacy lives on


in many ways, including through his holiday classic, A Charlie Brown Christmas.


1985


“Video has become our teacher, seller and


storyteller,” Newsweek said of the taped


medium that “permeates virtually every


corner of our culture.” It is “irrevocably


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who and what we are.” Today, Instagram,


TikTok and Snapchat are extensions of


that mighty trend. Just ask our youth.


1971


4 NEWSWEEK.COM


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The Archives

1993


“By the 1990s, America was awash in


nuclear waste,” Newsweek reported.


From “human guinea pigs in radiation


experiments” to “undisclosed nuclear


explosions” and “lethal atomic debris,”


Americans were victim to these risks.


Despite this, the public still doesn’t


know the “true dimensions of the


toxic mess.”