(Jacob Rumans) #1

11


As the track’s control tower looms large, he peelsoffandparks
up. We pop the long bonnet up, admiring the attentiontodetail
underneath and taking the chance to discuss both his initial
thoughts on the Ferrari and his own tastes in classiccars. ‘You
originally had me down to drive a blue NART Spider,’saysJames.
‘And while I wouldn’t have wanted to seem ungrateful,I’mgladthat
opportunity fell through. The looks of the originalare justright, and
for me it doesn’t quite work as a soft top. Ferrarididn’t intendthat,
hence the 275GTS. Noise and looks are also veryimportant forme
in any vehicle. This ticks both boxes, but the NARTwouldn’thave.
There’s also the question of colour, I’m not weddedto theideathat
Ferraris have to be red, but some Ferraris must be.’
Agreed, it’s definitely the 275GTB’s best hue, andthisparticular
example still wears its original paint. Back
in the cabin I reach behind his seat and
grab the car’s information sheet, handing
it him. He blows out a long whistle, as
he takes in the information, ‘It’s a three-
owner car that’s totally original and has
never been restored, and that 51,
mileage is absolutely correct,’ he says.
I add to that by informing him that it’s
from the proprietors of DK Engineering,
part of the Cottingham family’s personal


collection.‘That’srealtrust.Thevalueofthecardoesn’t botherme,
althoughI’mcertainlyawareofit.I supposebeing ona quiettrack
ratherthanthepublicroadhashelpedeaseanysuchconcerns–
moreimportant isitsoriginality,andthefactthat it’stheircar.’
Backonit,aswethunderroundthetrackthe275GTB’squad
ANSAtailpipesleavelittlegoldencyclonesintheirwake,asfallen
leavesare furiouslykickedup. I knowthisasI catchJamessmiling
atthespectacle,andturnroundmyself.‘Imovedmyseat a little
closerwhenwe stopped,soI cangeta betterpushontheclutch,’
heexplains– allthebetterforbarrellingon.He’salsoloweredhis
window,butthere’snoneedforanexplanationasto why.
‘It’s quiteconfusing withthespecforthismodel,’ admitsJames.
‘Three-carb, six-carb, long-nose, short-nose, quad cam, alloy...
butI mustsay, yougotit justright with
thisone.’That’ssomething ownerDavid
Cottinghamalludedtoinourtelephone
conversation the previous day, and I
repeat histhoughtsforJames,‘Yes,the
four-cams have a fantastic engine, but
theydon’t havethesamefeelontheroad
as the early cars, which have metallic
bushedwishbone eyesandnotrubber,
plusa relativelysolid-mountedengineas
ina 275GTBcompetitioncar.’

‘Listen to that noise...

it ’s just awesome.

The low-down growl

has morphed into

more of a howl’

1965 Ferrari 275GTB
Engine 3286cc, sohc-per-bank V12, three Weber
40DCN/3 carburettors Power 280bhp @ 7600rpm
Torque 217lb ft @ 5000rpm Transmission Five-
speed manual, rear-wheel drive Brakes Dunlop
discs Suspension Front and rear unequal-length
wishbones, coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll
bar Steering ZF worm and roller Weight 1100kg
(2425lb) Performance 0-60mph: 6.0sec. Top speed:
153mph Fuel consumption 15mpg Cost new £
Classic Cars Price Guide £1.1m-£1.7m

Ferrari 275GTB [The List]

Kicked-up Kamm tail
minimises drag and looks
great to our reader’s eyes